Classics

Treasure trove of milestones

The BMW Group has pooled all its classic activities at a single historic site. The new home of BMW Group Classic is a depot for classic vehicles, logistics centre, workshop, parts service, corporate archive and event venue all rolled into one. Even James Bond’s official car has found a new home here.

Photos
Thomas Dashuber
By
Heiko Zwirner

Life’s little luxuries all deserve their place: Karl Lagerfeld’s BMW 750iL was equipped with a tissue dispenser in the door trim and a fax machine in the glove compartment, to ensure the world-famous fashion designer could maintain contact with the business world while on the road. This was a highly exclusive extra, given that mobile communication was very much in its infancy when the car was delivered. The saloon, which dates from 1992, was also unusual in terms of its special paintwork – black down the sides, silver for the bonnet, roof and boot, as if in imitation of its owner’s distinctive look. Today it stands alongside 80 BMW classic vehicles in a light and airy hall in Munich’s Milbertshofen district.

Every vehicle here has a story to tell. The neighbour parked to the right of Karl Lagerfeld’s 7 Series, for example, is a dark-green BMW 501 complete with roof-mounted flashing blue light. Dubbed the “Baroque Angel”, it rose to celebrity in the early 1960s as an unlikely star in the popular German TV series Funkstreife Isar 12. To its left is the prototype BMW Turbo in 70s pop livery, with an elongated roofline and gullwing doors, which was first presented at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich. Even 45 years on, the car appears like a harbinger of some future world.

The gateway to the premises at Moosacher Straße 66, itself a listed historic monument, is indicative of a long and eventful past.

Futuristic supercar: built from 1978 to late 1981, the BMW M1 caused an instant sensation as a super sports car. It remained the exclusive preserve of a select circle of buyers, with a production run of just 399 models. As the grandaddy of all BMW M models, the BMW M1 remains one of the key landmarks in BMW history.

The hall is also part of the historic backdrop. The gateway to the premises at Moosacher Straße 66, itself a listed historic monument, is indicative of a long and eventful past. This is where BMW began assembling its first engines around 100 years ago. In its anniversary year the company has returned to the place of its origins to bring the Classic department’s various activities together in a fitting environment under one roof. “At the same time, we have created a focal point for owners of all BMW classic vehicles,” says Benjamin Voß, communications spokesperson for BMW Group Classic.

The 13,000-square-metre complex not only houses a significant part of the BMW collection, comprising around 1,400 exhibits in total. The ensemble of buildings is also home to the corporate archive, which manages a document inventory running to almost six kilometres in length, a classic workshop and a customer centre complete with parts service for owners of historic cars and motorcycles. Part of the old factory building has also been converted to an event hall for conferences and company events.

History in the making: the evolution of the iconic BMW kidney grille at a glance.

The BMW Group Classic location not only accommodates vehicles with a special place in BMW history. Customers can also bring in models for maintenance work and repairs (left). The rear seat from James Bond’s BMW in the film *Tomorrow Never Dies* (centre). A feast for fans: BMW rarities crowd the depot facility (right).

The BMW Group Classic location not only accommodates vehicles with a special place in BMW history. Customers can also bring in models for maintenance work and repairs (left). The rear seat from James Bond’s BMW in the film *Tomorrow Never Dies* (centre). A feast for fans: BMW rarities crowd the depot facility (right).

The hall housing the collection is like an automotive treasure trove featuring many landmarks in BMW history – including a BMW 3/15 PS, the first series model to come off the production lines in 1929; a BMW 303, the first car to feature the distinctive double kidney grille; and a freshly restored BMW 507, the only one of its kind with bright yellow paintwork. The collection also includes many spectacular one-offs and curiosities.

Tucked away against the rear wall is a somewhat battered BMW 7 Series, with a rocket launcher concealed beneath the sliding roof. In the James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies, lead actor Pierce Brosnan appears to operate the car by remote control. But all is revealed when you get closer to the stunt vehicle, of which four were built in total: in fact the driver was crouched in a recess cut out of the rear seat. Visibility was anything but ideal from this position, so the stunt man was forced to rely on camera images, which resulted in a minor collision during filming.

The pioneering BMW Futuro motorcycle concept, the BMW E1, was the first purpose-built electric car of recent times, while a hydrogen-powered racer set a new speed record of over 300 km/h in 2004. BMW Technik GmbH was dissolved to become part of the Group’s development department today, but its impressive design studies are displayed here like trophies around one of the mezzanine floors. The collection also includes motorcycles, racing cars and rare items from Group-owned brands MINI and Rolls-Royce. “In order to illustrate the evolution of the automobile at BMW and give the collection a linear structure, we have displayed the vehicles in a basic chronological order,” explains Florian Moser, responsible for cars at the corporate archive.

Guided tours through the hall are available by prior arrangement, although the classic depot is less an offshoot of the BMW Museum, more a kind of historic car pool with vehicles that are there to be driven. Many cars are road registered, ready to be fired up and shipped from here to classic events all over the world. Since moving to its new premises at Moosacher Straße 66, BMW Classic has coordinated major appearances at the Mille Miglia, the Goodwood Festival of Speed in southern England and the Concours d’Elegance at Pebble Beach, California.

On the other side of the classic workshop’s glass façade, erected between the reception area and the depot, the BMW mechanics have just finished servicing a flame-red BMW 328 following its return from the Mille Miglia. After around 1,500 kilometres of racing, the event has left no visible scars and the vehicle looks immaculate.

The mechanics at the BMW Group Classic workshop are engaged not just in restoring and servicing their own portfolio of classic vehicles, however. They also repair customer-owned vehicles and have access to an inventory of original parts that runs to over 55,000 individual items.

“Customer requests range from a simple oil change to a complete restoration, which may set owners back a six-figure sum,” says Kai Jacobsen, service advisor at the BMW Classic workshop. Vintage models and recent classics are more popular than ever in 2016, and unlike the old classic workshop at the Garching depot, here there is sufficient capacity to manage customer numbers as opposed to turning people away: “The average waiting time is now around four weeks, and we can sometimes even squeeze an extra car in if an emergency arises,” notes Jacobsen.

His customers are not just from Munich and the surrounding area, they come from all over Germany and the rest of Europe. “We’ve had cars from England, France and Portugal,” he says. “People come to us because no one else can help them – or because they don’t want to be helped anywhere else.”

On the lifting platform behind Jacobsen is a BMW 325i convertible from 1993. It is no great rarity, but the owner wanted to be sure his car was in good hands for its repair. He had it shipped here from Hong Kong.

The entrance to the new BMW Group Classic. This was BMW’s first purpose-built production facility, which from 1918 saw the start of engine production. In this, its centenary year, the company has returned to the place of its origins to bring the Classic department’s various activities together in a fitting environment under one roof.

10/28/2016